Tuesday, 8 October 2013

Ey Up, Me Duck

This year National Dialect Day will take place in Devon from 18th to 20th October. I think I'm right in saying that the National Dialect Day is not so much concerned with the accent people have as the alternative words they use. I'm sure they have lots of amazing words in Devon but we have our fair share in Leicester too.

You only have to go down to Leicester Market to be addressed with 'Ey up, me duck' instead of 'Good morning, Sir.' And if you do anything to surprise the stall holder he's likely to respond with, 'Ooooya beauty!' or 'Ark at him!'

As I've lived in Leicester all my life I'm not too sure which colloquialisms are local to Leicester and which are in general use throughout the country. Is it just in Leicester that you say:

       'frit' when you're frightened

       'Charlie's dead' when you're petticoat's showing

       'The Oakey Man' for the Ice cream van

       'Don't mither me' for don't bother me

       'Jitty' for alleyway

If there are any Leicester people reading this, then please add to the list. I'm sure there must be many more local words.

If you're not from Leicester then what local dialect words do you have round your way?


23 comments:

  1. Interestingly, I know 'ark at 'im and Charlie's dead from a Yorkshire childhood. So I don't think they're Leicester specific. One of the things I like to compare is what people call bread rolls. They're barm cakes where I come from. And stottie cakes a bit further north. But they're cobs around here. I'm sure there's loads more variations.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, they're definitely cobs here in Leicester. My London cousins think I'm weird if I talk about eating cobs. To them all bread rolls are called rolls. Boring, aren't they!

      Delete
  2. I admire those dialect coaches in films and the actors who are able to pick up realistic sounding accents and dialects. I'd love to be able to do that, but have not been overly successful on my own doing good impersonations. Maybe with a dialect coach.

    The colloquialisms would have me stumped if I heard them.

    Lee
    Wrote By Rote

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There must be many terms from your part of the world that would have me stumped, Arlee.

      Delete
  3. In Yorkshire, our alleyways are called ginnells

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I remember being somewhere up North where alleys are called Snickelways.

      Delete
    2. That must be West Yorkshire. They were snickets in North Yorks. Snickelways might be Lincs. Fascinating stuff, isn't it?

      Delete
  4. We dunt av any spcfc werds in artfordsher, we just tork with a naxent.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Betchya ya do have locl werds, an all, betchya.

      Delete
  5. Broad Wiltshire is lovely - but when it's really strong I can't understand it. But it involved a lot of 'r's.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I find dialects fascinating. Last night I was listening to an interview with Russel Brand and thinking how much more exciting it was to listen to British dialects than American. I can't judge how I sound but I bet Americans sound flat to others. There are the melodic highs and lows in the British.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love listening to American accents and I know you have dialect words that are different from ours, like sidewalk and trash cans.

      Delete
  7. I'm from Yorkshire, so we have plenty of dialect words, the trouble is, like you, I don't know which are specific to our area. I think mardy (meaning sulky) is one that's not widely known - though I could be mistaken!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We're proper mardy here in Leicester too.

      Delete
  8. I used to live in Dorset and there were heaps of lovely old words down there, but one thing I remember thinking was so special when I went there first was when they said "Where be you to?" It meant where are you going? Like Wiltshire, there's lots of arrrrr and errors. Remember that sone I've got a brand new combine 'arvester' by the Wurzels?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well thanks for that, Val. I now can't stop singing that annoying song!!! 🎶 I've got a brand new combine 'arvester...

      Delete
  9. Ey up, me duck for Good Morning Sir.
    I think that is cool.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The degree of 'coolness' depends on who is speaking and how it's said. It can be annoying... But not as annoying as that Wurzels' song from Val's comment above!!!

      Delete
  10. fun and interesting post to read. Quite a "foreign" language. Texas has its share of dialect and frankly it sounds foreign to this Yankee girl half the time. I hate "fix'in to" instead of "I'm going to do something.". That is Texas.

    ReplyDelete
  11. We have lots of Glasgow patter up here Ros. We have a Glasgow soap called River City and I must say I do cringe with the slang they mostly speak.I was always told to speak proper English but some slang words are good.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi Ros .. I wish my ear picked up more things like this - perhaps they do, but the brain doesn't hang on to them .. we have twitten for an alleyway ... and drove for road ...

    Bap - is beating the Americans on my blog!! Can't seem to get their head round a soft large brown 'roll' ... and Bara is what it's called in Cornwall .. bara for wheat ...

    The British Library .. was doing a project on voice/dialect .. recording them for posterity ... there's a lot more of those sorts of things going on ...

    I've got a Cornish dictionary or two - they must have lots of interesting original words ...

    Fascinating .. cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
  13. These are all great! My favorite is "Charlie's dead," though I hope my petticoat is never exposed!

    Julie

    ReplyDelete