Thursday, 10 January 2013

Richard III receives my award

This week I received an award from Anne Mackle at Is Anyone There? Thank you so much, Anne. In accepting the Award I have to announce my highlights from 2012. Last year was a year of mixed fortunes for me, many of which don't deserve further blog post space, but there is one event that is screaming to be talked about some more... Richard III.

For those who missed the news, and my blog posts from September 2012, archaeologists found the remains of what is thought/hoped to be King Richard III who died at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485. His body was brought back to Leicester but there was no record of its precise internment. You can read all about it in my September blog posts which I've linked here, here and here. Going along to view the dig was, for me, one of the most exciting highlights of 2012 and so it is to him that I dedicate this Award.
Archaeologists implied that there was little doubt that they had found the remains of this much-maligned King but for the last few months scientists have been studying DNA to see if it can be irrefutably confirmed. An announcement will be made in the first week of February and this will be followed by a television programme on Channel 4 which documented the entire dig and the subsequent investigations.

I can't wait to hear the news, watch the programme and find out what will be done with his body. Rumour has it that he will be buried at Leicester Cathedral and although the Cathedral is Church of England and Richard III was Roman Catholic, it would be a fitting place for him, especially as it's in the next street to the car park where his remains were recovered - assuming, of course, that it is his remains!

Watch this space for more news as it emerges!


27 comments:

  1. Congratulations on your award and congratulations on your dedication to honor Richard 111. I hope it is proven without a doubt to be him and that he is to be buried within your stomping grounds. So exciting.
    Cheers

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    1. Hi Manzanita, it certainly is exciting.

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  2. Surely Richard III was a Roman Catholic only because every Christian in England was at that time. Protestantism didn't fully exist then.

    As Queen Elizabeth II, the reigning English monarch, is Head of the Anglican Church it seems more appropriate for a former monarch to be re-buried accordingly.

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  3. PS. I was born in Leicester and am proud that my city has held him safe for so many years.

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    1. Hi Sally, I agree that it wouldn't be appropriate to have a different religious ceremony than the one of our own Queen's belief. I'm proud that we've kept him safe (if it is him!) for so many years.

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  4. I've been following this with great interest. Having a degree in Archaeology (Roman period) it is fascinating to see the past being unearthed. And this time in a 'proper' dig, not one of those 'Time- team' things. Awaiting developments!

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    1. I'm not sure but I think it might be the Time Team who are covering it... But it's a real find and I'll keep you updated!

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    2. Nothing wrong with time team i love it.

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    3. Nothing wrong with time team i love it.

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  5. Ros, I didn't 'know' you then, but I am riveted by this story. Years ago, I read a book by Josephine Tey (I think) and it was about Richard 111 and how much maligned he has been throughout history. A real case of history being written by the victors - in his case, the Tudors. I think it would be brilliant if they could prove this was his body and that he could be laid to rest in a place befitting his station.

    And Carol? I never knew you had a degree in Roman archaeology! That was my ambition in life when I was doing my A levels, but my grades were not good enough. I never was an A student, and that's what they wanted for archaeology then. Well, a combination of A's and B's. I just wasn't clever enough, but I went on a number of digs anyway, and like Ros, I found them thrilling.

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    1. That book is on my TBR pile, Val, and I wish I'd done Archeology at Uni now. My degree was History from 55BC.

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    2. Ros, your history degree is one I would have loved too! I see Inger has the name of the book, Daughter of Time. I'm sure you'll find it riveting too, Ros! Wonderful to have met both other writers and other history fans on Blogger. Thank you!

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  6. Congrats on the award! I am waiting with baited breath (what a weird expression) to find out if this is, indeed, Richard III. I have been a fan of his since I first read the book, Daughter of Time, was it? And, of course, since I read the play, saw the play in the theater, and saw the film. I also read those wonderful historical novels about the English kings that I must have gotten rid of and now regret.

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    1. Yes, that was the book that Val was referring to. Must get around to reading it.

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  7. Congrats on the award... and on watching the dig. How exciting! You were seeing history in the making.

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    1. Thanks, Susan. I've always been fascinated by history.

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  8. I'm watching, Ros - and looking forward to you telling us more.

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    1. And I'm looking forward to hearing more about your Laos adventures. They put my 'viewing an archeological dig' into the shade ;-)

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  9. Only a couple of weeks to go Ros...and I'm really excited!

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  10. It's amazing how experts can find out facts this way. I'll remain alert for the finding.

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  11. Congrats on your reward. Indeed, after reading a teensy item in the paper here, your blog posts and actual pictures, actually seeing, etc were very exciting. That was a good highlight. Here's to more in 2013

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  12. Wow! Thats amazing I can't wait to find out if it really is him.

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  13. Congratulations on your award, Ros. Well deserved. My children used to go to Leicester Grammar School and the art department is so close to where the body was found. It's amazing to think what is underneath our feet as we walk around the city.

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  14. I remember your excitement when the dig was announced - it will be fascinating to hear the results of the test, though I always feel a little sad when long-dean human remains are treated simply as items for research. Luckily I will never be famous enough to be that interesting, and I'm going to be burnt anyway! Congratulations on the award and happy 2013.

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  15. Long-dead - apologies for the typo!

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  16. Hi Ros .. congratulations on the award ... but congratulations to the archaeologists and DNA scientists exploring the man's remains .. it'll be amazing to hear the result and I'm looking forward to seeing the C4 programme - I must keep an eye open for it - except I'm sure you'll alert us ..

    So pleased you can take an active part in the discoveries ... cheers Hilary

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